Cover of book The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results

The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results

by: Gary Keller, Jay Papasany

Check out the book on Amazon | your public library.
114 Highlights | 6 Notes
  • “Going small” is ignoring all the things you could do and doing what you should do.
  • So every day they line up their priorities anew, find the lead domino, and whack away at it until it falls.
  • success has its own lies too. “I just have too much that has to be done.” “I’ll get more done by doing things at the same time.” “I need to be a more disciplined person.” “I should be able to do what I want whenever I want.” “I need more balance in my life.” “Maybe I shouldn’t dream so big.” Repeat these thoughts often enough
  • THE SIX LIES BETWEEN YOU AND SUCCESS Everything Matters Equally Multitasking A Disciplined Life Willpower Is Always on Will-Call A Balanced Life Big Is Bad
  • “The things which are most important don’t always scream the loudest.” —Bob Hawke
  • While to-dos serve as a useful collection of our best intentions, they also tyrannize us with trivial, unimportant stuff
  • that we feel obligated to get done—because it’s on our list.
  • “The 80/20 Principle asserts that a minority of causes, inputs, or effort usually lead to a majority of the results, outputs, or rewards.”
    Note: What minority of interview prep do i need to do to land a job?Get resume conversionGet past phone interview 1Get past phone interviews 2Crack coding interview
  • A small amount of causes creates most of the results. Just the right input creates most of the output. Selected effort creates almost all of the rewards.
  • Juran’s great insight was that not everything matters equally; some things matter more than others—a lot more.
  • FIG. 4 A to-do list becomes a success list when you prioritize it.
  • That’s thinking big, but going very small.
  • The inequality of effort for results is everywhere in your life if you will simply look for it.
    Note: Climbing - what one thing i can do to improve my climbing, take my climbing to the next level?Increase upperbody finger strengthReduce body weightKeep my tech niqueWhat over thing to increase uppwrbody strength?Kettle bellsWhat one thing for finger strength ?Hsngbiard
  • There will always be just a few things that matter more than the rest, and out of those, one will matter most.
  • focus on being productive. Allow what matters most to drive your day. Go extreme. Once you’ve figured out what actually matters, keep asking what matters most until there is only one thing left. That core activity goes at the top of your success list. Say no. Whether you say “later” or “never,” the point is to say “not now” to anything else you could do until your most important work is done. Don’t get trapped in the “check off” game.
  • The truth is that things don’t matter equally and success is found in doing what matters most.
  • doing the most important thing is always the most important thing.
  • “To do two things at once is to do neither.” —Publilius Syrus
  • It’s not that we have too little time to do all the things we need to do, it’s that we feel the need to do too many things in the time we have.
  • Why would we ever tolerate multitasking when we’re doing our most important work?
  • Distraction is natural. Don’t feel bad when you get distracted. Everyone gets
  • distracted. Multitasking takes a toll. At home or at work, distractions lead to poor choices, painful mistakes, and unnecessary stress. Distraction undermines results. When you try to do too much at once, you can end up doing nothing well. Figure
  • Contrary to what most people believe, success is not a marathon of disciplined action. Achievement doesn’t require you to be a full-time disciplined person where your every action is trained and where control is the solution to every situation. Success is actually a short race—a sprint fueled by discipline just long enough for habit to kick in and take over.
  • So when you see people who look like “disciplined” people, what you’re really seeing is people who’ve trained a handful of habits into their lives.
  • success is about doing the right thing, not about doing everything right.
  • Not to oversimplify, but it’s not a stretch to say that Phelps channeled all of his energy into one discipline that developed into one habit—swimming daily.
  • Your life gets clearer and less complicated because you know what you have to do well and you know what you don’t.
  • When you do the right thing, it can liberate you from having to monitor everything.
  • SIXTY-SIX DAYS TO THE SWEET SPOT
  • Willpower is so important that using it effectively should be a high priority.
  • Here’s an interesting fact. The “last in, first out” theory is very much at work inside our head.
  • Foods that elevate blood sugar evenly over long periods, like complex carbohydrates and proteins, become the fuel of choice for high-achievers—literal proof that “you are what you eat.”
  • When your most important work is done while your willpower wanes, default will define your level of achievement. Average is often the result.
    Note: Too many chores before work and i get super distracted at work.Do what's important the first 2 his in the morning. 1 hr for me - 2 nd hour for work. How's foes treat work,? Afternoon nap is fine if you need it.
  • You make doing what matters most a priority when your willpower is its highest.
  • WHAT TAXES YOUR WILLPOWER Implementing new behaviors Filtering distractions Resisting temptation Suppressing emotion Restraining aggression Suppressing impulses Taking tests Trying to impress others Coping with fear Doing something you don’t enjoy Selecting long-term over
  • short-term rewards
  • So, if you want to get the most out of your day, do your most important work—your ONE Thing—early, before your willpower is drawn down.
  • Don’t fight your willpower. Build your days around how it works
  • Purpose, meaning, significance—these are what make a successful life. Seek them and you will most certainly live your life out of balance, criss-crossing an invisible middle line as you pursue your priorities.
  • In your effort to attend to all things, everything gets shortchanged and nothing gets its due.
  • Knowing when to pursue the middle and when to pursue the extremes is in essence the true beginning of wisdom.
  • Time waits for no one. Push something to an extreme and postponement can become permanent.
  • When you gamble with your time, you may be placing a bet you can’t cover. Even if you’re sure you can win, be careful that you can live with what you lose.
  • The problem is that when you focus on what is truly important, something will always be underserved.
  • Leaving some things undone is a necessary tradeoff for extraordinary results. But you can’t leave everything undone,
  • In your professional life, go long and make peace with the idea that the pursuit of extraordinary results may require you to be out of balance for long periods.
  • The question of balance is really a question of priority.
  • The challenge becomes how long you stay on your priority. To be able to address your priorities outside of work, be clear about your most important work priority so you can get it done. Then go home and be clear about your priorities there so you can get back to work.
  • “We are kept from our goal, not by obstacles but by a clear path to a lesser goal.” —Robert Brault
  • The good news is that science isn’t about guessing, but rather the art of progressing. And so is your life.
  • No one knows their ultimate ceiling for achievement, so worrying about it is a waste of time.
  • What you build today will either empower or restrict you tomorrow.
  • action—a “growth” mindset that generally thinks big and seeks growth and a “fixed” mindset that places artificial limits and avoids failure.
  • Don’t fear big. Fear mediocrity. Fear waste. Fear the lack of living to your fullest.
  • Act bold. Big thoughts go nowhere without bold action.
  • Don’t fear failure. It’s as much a part of your journey to extraordinary results as success.
  • And last, I started doing less. Yes, less. Intentionally, purposefully less.
  • I learned that success comes down to this: being appropriate in the moments of your life. If you can honestly say, “This is where I’m meant to be right now, doing exactly what I’m doing,” then all the amazing possibilities for your life become possible.
  • The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret to getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into small manageable
  • tasks and then starting on the first one.
  • I worked for a menials hire, Only to learn, dismayed, That any wage I had asked of Life, Life would have willingly paid.
  • paid.” One of the most empowering moments of my life came when I realized that life is a question and how we live it is our answer. How we phrase the questions we ask ourselves determines the answers that
  • eventually become our life.
  • “What’s the ONE Thing I can do today for [whatever you want] such that by doing it everything else will be easier or even unnecessary?”
  • I believe that financially wealthy people are those who have enough money coming in without having to work to finance their purpose in life.
  • So, go to your calendar and block off all the time you need to accomplish your ONE Thing.
  • If it’s a regular thing, block off the appropriate time every day so it becomes a habit.
  • If disproportionate results come from one activity, then you must give that one activity disproportionate time.
  • Once you’ve done your ONE Thing for the day, you can devote the rest of it to everything else.
  • Getting “everything else” done may help you sleep better at night, but it’s unlikely to earn you a promotion.
  • To achieve extraordinary results and experience greatness, time block these three things in the following order: Time block your time off. Time block your ONE Thing. Time block your planning time.
  • In A Geography of Time, Robert Levine points out that most people work on “clock” time—“It’s five o’clock, I’ll see you tomorrow”— while others work on “event” time— “My work is done when it’s done.”
  • The key to making this work is to block time as early in your day as you possibly can. Give yourself 30 minutes to an hour to take care of morning priorities, then move to your ONE Thing. My recommendation is to block four hours a day. This isn’t a typo. I repeat: four hours a day.
  • To experience extraordinary results, be a maker in the morning and a manager in the afternoon.
  • For annual planning, schedule this time late enough in the year that you have a sense of your trajectory, but not so late that you lose your running start for the next.
  • Block an hour each week to review your annual and monthly goals.
    Note: Live your legend style
  • The world doesn’t know your purpose or priorities and isn’t responsible for them—you are. So it’s your job to protect your time blocks from all those who don’t know what matters most to you, and from yourself when you forget. The best way to protect your time blocks is to adopt the mindset that they can’t be moved.
  • Day in and day out, your own need to do other things instead of your ONE Thing may be your biggest challenge to overcome.
  • What’s the ONE Thing I can do to protect my time block every day such by doing it everything else I might do will be easier or unnecessary?
  • when you can see mastery as a path you go down instead of a destination you arrive at, it starts to feel accessible and attainable.
  • The path is one of an apprentice learning and relearning the basics on a never-ending journey of greater experience and expertise.
  • The path of mastering something is the combination of not only doing the best you can do at it, but also doing it the best it can be done. Continually improving how you do something is critical to getting the most from time blocking.
  • Entrepreneurial is our natural approach. It’s seeing something we want to do or that needs to be done and racing off to do it with enthusiasm, energy, and our natural abilities.
  • With a “P” mindset, you can achieve breakthroughs and accomplish things far beyond your natural abilities. You must simply be willing to do whatever it takes.
  • The Purposeful approach says, “I’m still committed to growing, so what are my options?” You then use the Focusing Question to narrow those choices down to the next thing you should do.
    Note: Ask for sofobomo
  • Being Purposeful is often about doing what comes “unnaturally,” but when you’re committed to achieving extraordinary results, you simply do whatever it takes anyway.
  • Taking complete ownership of your outcomes by holding no one but yourself responsible for them is the most powerful thing you can do to drive your success.
  • Find a coach. You’ll be hard-pressed to find anyone who achieves extraordinary results without one. Remember, we’re not talking
  • “Focus is a matter of deciding what things you’re not going to do.” —John Carmack
  • THE FOUR THIEVES OF PRODUCTIVITY Inability to Say “No” Fear of Chaos Poor Health Habits Environment Doesn’t Support Your Goals
  • Someone once told me that one “yes” must be defended over time by 1,000 “nos.”
  • When you say yes to something, it’s imperative that you understand what you’re saying no to.
  • “One-half of knowing what you want is knowing what you must give up before you get it.”
  • You can’t please everyone, so don’t try. In fact, when you try, the one person
  • The biggest lesson I’ve learned is that it helps to have a philosophy and an approach to managing my space.
  • One of the greatest thieves of productivity is the unwillingness to allow for chaos or the lack of creativity in dealing with it. Focusing on ONE Thing has a guaranteed consequence: other things don’t get done.
    Note: Omg. Ok. If littlereads has to tAke off what won't be get done?
  • There will always be unfinished work and loose ends lying around to snare your focus. Your time block can feel like a submersible, where the deeper you commit to your ONE Thing, the more the pressure mounts for you to come up for air and address everything you’ve put on hold. Eventually it can feel like even the tiniest leak might trigger an all-out implosion.
  • When you strive for greatness, chaos is guaranteed to show up.
  • “If a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then, is an empty desk a sign?” —Albert Einstein
  • If you have to be creative, then be creative. Just don’t be a victim of your circumstances. Don’t sacrifice your time block on the altar of “I just can’t make it work.”
  • “The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.” — William James
  • Personal energy mismanagement is a silent thief of productivity.
  • High achievement and extraordinary results require big energy. The trick is learning how to get it and keep it. So, what can you do?
  • Begin early with meditation and prayer for spiritual energy;
  • Productive people thrive on emotional energy; it fills their heart with joy and makes them light on their feet.
  • When you get to work, go to work on your ONE Thing. If you’re like me and have some morning priorities you must get done first, then give yourself an
  • hour at most to do them. Don’t loiter and don’t slow down.
  • Around noon, take a break, have lunch, and turn your attention to everything else you can do before you head out for the day.
  • THE HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE PERSON’S DAILY ENERGY PLAN Meditate and pray for spiritual energy. Eat right, exercise, and sleep sufficiently for physical energy. Hug, kiss, and laugh with loved ones for emotional energy. Set goals, plan, and calendar for mental energy. Time block your ONE Thing for business energy.
  • No one succeeds alone and no one fails alone. Pay attention to the people around you. Seek out those who will support your goals, and show the door to anyone who won’t.
  • What is around you will either aim you toward your time block or pull you away.
  • Walk through the path you’ll take each day, and eradicate all the sight and sound thieves that you find.
  • even the same thing, forever. I’m saying that at any moment in time there can be only ONE Thing, and when that ONE Thing is in line with your purpose and sits atop your priorities, it will be the most productive thing you can do to launch you toward the best you can be.
  • Success is an inside job. Put yourself together, and your world falls into place. When you bring purpose to your life, know your priorities, and achieve high productivity on the priority that matters most every day, your life makes sense and the extraordinary becomes possible.